Raspberries and Lime: Linen-Blend Bandana-Style Hand Knit Scarf

Patterns available on Ravelry
Accessories available on Etsy

 

This bandana-style scarf is basically a triangle knit from the top down, alternating stripes of color with bands of an eyelet Roman Stripes pattern and a final edge that incorporates a Fireflowers slipped stitch pattern.

It’s perfect as a summer evening wrap – or works equally as well as an after-beach cover-up!

The yarn I used in the sample is Blacker Yarns Lyonesse 4-ply that’s a blend of linen and Corriedale wool. It used most of 1 ball of Tourmaline and 1 ball of Citrine. The yarn produces a crisp fabric with excellent stitch definition.

Raspberries and Lime – because there’s a refreshing and fruity feel about this combination of colors and stitch patterns. It’s sure to add a welcome and eye-catching touch to your neckline at any time of the year!

Measurements: 41×15.5 in (104×39.4 cm)

Pattern available on Ravelry and the scarf itself is available on Etsy.

Happy Knitting!
MikeH

Traditional Cabled Aran Hat

Patterns available on Ravelry
Accessories available on Etsy

This traditional cabled Aran hat was the last of the 2 final projects for my Master Hand Knitting Program of The Knitting Guild Association.

It was designed and knit by hand by me. I knit the hat in the round using Donegal Yarns Original Aran Natural Yarn in natural light cream white (báinín).

This is a view of the top, showing the patterned decreases:

The hat is an adult’s size L and measures 9.5in / 24cm from beginning of brim to top of crown. I’ll be working up a pattern for it if anyone’s interested.

Happy Knitting!
MikeH

My First Traditional Fair Isle Gansey: Finished!

Patterns available on Ravelry
Accessories available on Etsy

I just finished knitting this all-over Fair Isle-patterned gansey. It was designed following a traditional shape I found in Michael Pearson’s Traditional Knitting and some patterns I found in A Shetlander’s Fair Isle Graph Book in Colour.

The first photo is on its own; the second is the gansey worn by the recipient; and the third is the piece of Asian embroidery that inspired the color palette.


The finished measurements:
Chest – 45in (114.3cm)
Length – 25.75in (65.4cm)

I’m working up the pattern for a man’s size L (US).

This is one of the final two projects for my Master Hand Knitting Program of The Knitting Guild Association.

The other project is a traditional cabled Aran hat. I’ll be posting some photos of that project soon.

Happy Knitting!
MikeH

A Quick Update on the Fair Isle Gansey

Patterns available on Ravelry
Accessories available on Etsy


Right sleeve done! This is the progress to date on my traditional Fair Isle-patterned gansey.

I’m posting this to keep myself motivated – and honest. I’m quite pleased overall with the result but frustrated with how long it’s taking.

I can’t believe that I still have another sleeve to do!

Hopefully I’ll be able to show the completed garment soon.

Happy Knitting!
MikeH

Traditional Fair-Isle Patterned Gansey

Patterns available on Ravelry
Accessories available on Etsy

I’ve been bitten by the Fair Isle bug and am designing a man’s traditional Fair Isle patterned gansey. As you can see this is a work in progress!

This design is for The Knitting Guild Association Master Hand Knitter Program.

I still need to pick-up stitches for the sleeves , cut the steeks at the armholes, finish the gussets, knit the sleeves, and add the neckline trim. I’m taking a vacation first though!

As I work through this garment I’m preparing a pattern with charts that I’ll make available when it’s completed and reviewed. This is a man’s size large and knit with Jamiesons of Shetland Spindrift wool.

Happy Knitting!
MikeH

The Perfect Start for a Circular Knitting Project

Patterns available on Ravelry
Accessories available on Etsy

I’ve just finished a knit doily sample and wanted to share the cast-on method I used in case anyone plans to tackle this type of project in the round. It’s certainly suitable for circular shawls as well!

The technique creates a really smooth, neat, round center as you can see in the photo above of this piece being blocked.

Here’s one of the best tutorials I found on the the Magic Ring Cast-On:

Emily Ocker’s Circular Cast-On (Magic Ring Cast-On)

Hope you find it useful.

Happy Knitting!
MikeH

Traditional Fair Isle Fisherman’s Kep – Finished, Blocked and Tasseled

Patterns available on Ravelry
Accessories available on Etsy

Here’s a photo of my first kep finished, blocked and tasseled.

Here’s a photo of the same kep being worn in the wilds of coastal Thailand!

I joined a knit-a-long on Facebook because I wanted to build my stranded colorwork skills and thought an online group would be a good way to do this.

It’s been a great experience, and in the process, buying the pattern has helped support the museum on Fair Isle – a very worthy cause indeed.

If you’re interested in knitting one of these hats, you can visit The Fair Isle Fisherman’s Kep Page on Facebook and ask to become a member.

The pattern you purchase gives a lot of helpful guidelines and allows you to choose from a selection of Fair Isle designs to create a masterpiece of your own, also choosing colors that interest you.

For my kep I used a range of colors from Jamiesons of Shetland, in their Spindrift range: ginger, cinammon, buttercup, flax and mermaid.

Happy Knitting!
MikeH

Knitting a Fair Isle Fisherman’s Kep

Patterns available on Ravelry
Accessories available on Etsy

I’ve been learning more about Fair Isle knitting recently and wanted to  try a pattern that used this color-stranded knitting technique before embarking on a larger project for my Master Hand Knitting course.

I found a group on Facebook that offered a paid pattern by an expert in the technique, with proceeds going to support the museum on Fair Isle.

It’s a closed group, but if you’re interested in joining a knit-a-long and meet knitters from around the world, it’s worth going to the site and asking to be added as a member:

The Fair Isle Fisherman’s Kep Page

The photo above shows my progress on the kep (cap) – one more small pattern repeat and I’ll be ready to start the decreases, add a tassel and then block the cap.

I hope to wear it when I visit Fair Isle in July.  It’s not really suitable for the climate here in Thailand.

Happy Knitting!
MikeH